(1) How much self-tracking is too much? From your experience, is there a general inflection point? How do you maintain balance? Do you keep track of how much time/effort goes into self-tracking itself? The idea of self-tracking can scare away a lot of people who feel like they already don’t have enough time in the day to do the essentials. So how do we keep it simple?

(2) How do I figure out which KPIs are important for me to create and track in my own life?

(3) Is there a way to add the idea of collaboration into this? I’m asking because in the future I would like to implement the idea of family-tracking? What would be some examples of KPIs that I should track on a family level?

(4) In my mind, family-tracking seems more fun than self-tracking because you get to support and encourage one another. It also adds even more accountability. To me, it’s exciting to see where the entire family is heading over the course of the year. What do you think? Based on your research, is the idea of family-tracking new? Or did other smarty pants already think of it?

(5) In your analysis, did you discover some variation of the Pareto Principle in your self-tracking data? Shouldn’t we just track the 20% that accounts for 80% of our results in life? The ONE Thing by Gary Keller suggests that we keep applying the 80–20 rule until we cannot do it anymore. Hence the title of the book: The ONE Thing. What do you think of the idea of tracking ONE activity?

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Linguist • accent coach • instructional designer | accentamazing.com

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Adrian Lin

Adrian Lin

Linguist • accent coach • instructional designer | accentamazing.com